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The original book thread

Enter here to talk about books, art, literature, film, TV and anything else to do with popular culture.
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Lifelinking
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Re: What Kind of God? by Michael Ots

#181 Post by Lifelinking » May 8th, 2009, 6:35 pm

Latest post of the previous page:

Hey Compassionist - I have not read this - would you recommend it?

(nice to see a post from you btw)
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Re: What Kind of God? by Michael Ots

#182 Post by Compassionist » May 8th, 2009, 10:09 pm

Nice to hear from you, too. I have missed this forum. I would not recommend buying it but if you are curious you can browse through it in a bookstore or in a library or from someone who has a copy. I noticed some significant flaws in the content and was wondering if others had noticed them.

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Lifelinking
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Re: What Kind of God? by Michael Ots

#183 Post by Lifelinking » May 8th, 2009, 10:14 pm

Cool C, hope you can stick around :)
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Understanding Power: The Indispensable Chomsky

#184 Post by Compassionist » May 10th, 2009, 8:44 am

Has anyone read this book? Would anyone like to discuss this book? Thank you.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Understanding-P ... 372&sr=8-1

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Hestia
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Re: The original book thread

#185 Post by Hestia » June 22nd, 2009, 3:25 am

I just finished reading My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult. I thought it brought up some interesting ethical issues, but the ending was a total copout. Not sure what my next book is going to be...possibly a nice, intense psychological thriller by Jonathan Kellerman.

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Paolo
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Re: The original book thread

#186 Post by Paolo » June 23rd, 2009, 1:48 pm

I'm currently reading The Tiger That Isn't by Blastland & Dilnot. It's a great primer for those who are scared of numbers - it deals with statistics in a ver accessible way and it provides some lovely examples of just how badly our society deals with numbers. Well worth a look!

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Hestia
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Re: The original book thread

#187 Post by Hestia » June 24th, 2009, 4:02 am

Oh, Paolo, that's exactly the kind of book I need. I'm a social worker--great with the touchy-feely emotional stuff, but scared into a coma if anyone asks me to crunch numbers. It's not that I'm really stupid about it, because I always got top grades in math, but I just never felt really comfortable with numbers. Maybe I should give The Tiger That Isn't a try.

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Alan H
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Re: The original book thread

#188 Post by Alan H » June 24th, 2009, 9:12 am

Even though I can do some sums, it looks like an interesting book [---][/---] it's only £5 and it's now on my Amazon wish list.
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Re: The original book thread

#189 Post by Maria Mac » July 24th, 2009, 2:40 pm

I'd had the book The Naked Jape by Jimmy Carr & Lucy Greves a while but only read it after a very disappointing evening at a comedy club (blogged about here). The book gives a concise history and analysis of joking and - best of all - has hundreds of jokes in it, many of them really funny. The most interesting chapters deal with issues around offensiveness: sexist and racist jokes etc.

Recommended.

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#190 Post by Gurdur » August 3rd, 2009, 11:47 pm

Compassionist wrote:Has anyone read this book? Would anyone like to discuss this book? Thank you.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Understanding-P ... 372&sr=8-1
Noam Chomsky's greatest mistake was in always centering on the USA; he displays no real interest in anyone else except as victim, and bluntly, the USA for all its manifold mistakes and past evils is still a hell of a lot better than a few other large powers one could name, let alone a horde of lesser ones. Chomsky's concentration on the USA twists his ethics into unrealistic and illogical knots.
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At the moment, I am carefully re-reading Nick Cohen, "What's Left?", and I want to do a series of OP's on my own board about the questions and issues Cohen raises. The implosion of the left concerns me a great deal; and I think it has very pertinent connections to issues concerning atheist activism. I don't always agree with Cohen's points at all, but he raises issues needing careful consideration.

Plus I should get in the post very soon "Unscientific America: How Scientific Illiteracy Threatens Our Future", by Chris Mooney and Sheril Kirshenbaum, a book that has caused a minor firestorm in atheist blogging circles, with PZ Myers, Coyne and Ophelia Benson all furiously strawmanning a short section of the book or otherwise being rather stupidly snide about it as well as evasive, as well as Myers stupidly flaming one entire multi-blog site for asinine reasons. Ho diddy hum, it's not just the Left who have problems. Once I've got my grubby little paws on the book, I'll write a review of it and a number of OP's and blog posts about various issues raised in it.

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Re: The original book thread

#191 Post by jdc » August 6th, 2009, 9:07 pm

Paolo wrote:I'm currently reading The Tiger That Isn't by Blastland & Dilnot. It's a great primer for those who are scared of numbers - it deals with statistics in a ver accessible way and it provides some lovely examples of just how badly our society deals with numbers. Well worth a look!
I read that recently following a recommendation from someone on another forum I post on. Enjoyed it. Similarly, I've also read and enjoyed How To Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff.

Other books: I've read some very interesting books by psychologists (e.g., Irrationality by Stuart Sutherland and Influence: Science and Practice by Robert Cialdini, both of which I thoroughly enjoyed and have re-read). I thought Unweaving the Rainbow (Dawkins) and Bad Science (Goldacre) were both excellent. Harry G Frankfurt's On Bullshit is a fascinating essay.
I'm also a fan of Feynman (Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman ; The Pleasure of Finding Things Out). I read Francis Wheen’s How Mumbo Jumbo Conquered the World quite a long time ago so can't remember much about it but ISTR that there's some interesting points about how woolly thinking took hold (and he focuses more on religion and politics than the other writers I've mentioned). I’ve read Counterknowledge (Damien Thompson) and Flat Earth News (Nick Davies) and would recommend those.

I don't read much fiction, but I used to enjoy detective novels (Dexter's Morse and Conan-Doyle's Holmes) and the last fiction book I read was The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time.
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Re: The original book thread

#192 Post by Zoe » August 13th, 2009, 1:03 pm

Anybody else read Marilyn French's The Women's Room, which was rereleased this year on its 30th anniversary? I found it a real page turner.

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Re: The original book thread

#193 Post by Fia » August 13th, 2009, 1:52 pm

I loved "The Women's Room" first time round, it was an exciting and liberating read for a 20ish emergent feminist. It's on my read again list, I wonder how dated I might find it... clearly 30 years later it still spoke to Zoe...

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Re: The original book thread

#194 Post by Maria Mac » August 13th, 2009, 3:18 pm

I, along with all my friends and colleagues, read it when it first came out and I had the same reaction as Fia. When I saw the new edition I bought it and started reading it and it did have a very 'bygone era' feel about it. I got about halfway through and started to feel bored so I passed it to my daughter who read it very quickly and enjoyed it but agreed it read very much like historical fiction rather than a description of women's lot in the USA today. I'll try to finish it.

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Re: The original book thread

#195 Post by New man » August 14th, 2009, 4:57 pm

Long ago ,I gave up buying or reading "dream books" (Short stories and novels). Instead now I read Mags and non fictions. If I need a dream world then I watch Tv or buy a dvd.
Recently read my best book is 'The Ancestor's Tale' by Richard Dawkin. Great book . and I love it to re read. :smile:

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Alan C.
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Re: The original book thread

#196 Post by Alan C. » August 14th, 2009, 7:38 pm

Hi New man, if you enjoyed ancestor's tale I would recommend, The blind watchmaker. a devils chaplain, and the selfish gene, all by Richard Dawkins, and of course The God delusion if you haven't already read it.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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Val
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Re: The original book thread

#197 Post by Val » August 15th, 2009, 9:54 pm

I am with Fia and Maria on the subject of the Womens Room. I remember feeling that it was life changing, but now I am not so sure. Have not read the re-issue.

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Ninny
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Re: The original book thread

#198 Post by Ninny » August 16th, 2009, 8:11 am

I've just read "Ella Minnow Pea" by Mark Dunn - liked it so much I sent it to two of my children for their birthdays. A sort of moral tale with alphabetical letters. (Bought it for Jaywhat originally, but he didn't like it...) Worth a shot if you want something really different.

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Re: The original book thread

#199 Post by New man » August 17th, 2009, 4:25 pm

Alan C. wrote:Hi New man, if you enjoyed ancestor's tale I would recommend, The blind watchmaker. a devils chaplain, and the selfish gene, all by Richard Dawkins, and of course The God delusion if you haven't already read it.
Except the devils chaplain, the rest I have. :smile:

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Alan C.
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Re: The original book thread

#200 Post by Alan C. » August 17th, 2009, 7:28 pm

I'm nearing the end of "The Entity" 5 centuries of secret Vatican espionage, by Eric Frattini.
Next time a religionite mentions Hitler, Stalin, Mao, or Pol Pot, tell them to read this book.
The above mentioned dictators couldn't hold a candle to the Popes of the middle ages.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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Re: The original book thread

#201 Post by Maria Mac » August 22nd, 2009, 10:25 am

New man wrote: Recently read my best book is 'The Ancestor's Tale' by Richard Dawkin. Great book . and I love it to re read. :smile:
The Ancestor's Tale is one of my audiobooks that I listen to at night on my ipod to help me relax and fall asleep. I found it so interesting that I bought the real book to read but haven't started it yet.

At the moment I'm reading Supersense by Bruce Hood, Irrationality by Stuart Sutherland and Straw Dogs by John Gray. Oh, and Peter Cave's new book on Humanism and a Ruth Rendell novel, which was an impulse buy at an airport....

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